Citizen Action Monitor

Caring of the elderly: Canada needs a radically different approach to long-term care

Burlington, Ontario councillor Paul Sharman sees the US P.A.C.E. program as a way to keep seniors out of care facilities and in their own homes. —

No 2811 by fw, January 11, 2022 —

Following is a slice of dialog from CBC’s January 7, 2022 broadcast of The National News, involving Dave Common (DC) and councillor Paul Sharman (PS).

DC: Paul Sharman wants to change that. The city councillor for Burlington Ontario is motivated by the failings he’s seen in long-term care – where his mother developed pneumonia three times before she died in hospital.

PS: Everything that could have been done in the community to keep her in health and a better quality of life, was not done. And the lesson I learned from that is that long-term care for me is necessary but insufficient.

DC: Following the Michigan example, Sharman’s brought the P.A.C.E. program north to downtown Burlington. At this senior’s apartment building they plan to have some health services to reduce visits to hospitals.

PS: Eighty percent of patient load is driven by people over the age of 80. So, if we can take steps to keep people healthier and their quality of life better for longer, we reduce the capacity required in the health care system. … I see what happened with my mother. And I know there are so many people who are worrying about their parents barely coping. People say, “Okay, we need 30,000 more long-term care beds,” and I’m saying, “No. We need a hundred or two hundred thousand P.A.C.E. capacity.”

DC: He’s convinced this is the model to expand. Support seniors to stay out of care facilities and stay here, in their own homes.

Councillor Paul Sharman

Below is my repost of this engaging news item, including an embedded 4:34-minute video and my complete transcript of the dialog. The video clip begins 25:17 minutes into the broadcast and ends at 29:51.

Clicking on the linked title below will take you to the beginning of the complete broadcast; from there skip forward to the 25:17 mark, the start of the clip titled: Caring for the elderly: A different approach.

**********

Caring for the elderly: A different approach, CBC News, The National, January 7, 2022.

To watch the clip Caring for the elderly, skip forward to the 25:17 mark.

TRANSCRIPT

Ian Hanomansing (News host): Welcome back. As the pandemic exposes some of the difficulties faced by people in this country, we want to take a look at places where senior care is being done differently. Tonight, a move to change things in an Ontario city inspired by a program south of the border. David Common (DC) explains.

Woman’s voice: “B-7, B-7.”

DC: At first glance you might think – “This is a nursing home.” But this Detroit program is actually designed to keep people OUT of care.

Woman’s voice: “N-35.”

DC: Providing day programs, social and medical services to 4400 people who live in their own homes, but they can come here as often as they need. Mary Neighbour runs several centres like this.

DC: How many would be in a nursing home were it not for the program you operate?

MN: They would all be in homes, probably.

DC: All of them?

MN: Yes, probably. If their families couldn’t take care of them…

DC: So, you found a solution that costs less, much less.

MN: Yes.

DC: You believe [it] provides a higher quality of life…?

MN: I don’t just believe it. We have research that says it. Yes.

DC: Across southeast Michigan, this middle-ground option — neither fully at home nor fully IN a home — is called P.A.C.E., or Program of All-inclusive CarE.

Woman’s voice: “Yeah, here we go.”

Its onsite clinic addresses health issues before they become an emergency, aiming to limit costly visits to the hospital.

MN: They’re never going to be better, so to speak, but the quality of life will be retained.

DC: The approach also saves the state 30 to 40% off the cost of a nursing home.

Man’s voice: “How’s your breathing right now?”

DC: But in Canada, demand for this kind of in-between model far outstrips availability.

Paul Sharman (PS): That item passes.

DC: Paul Sharman wants to change that. The city councillor for Burlington Ontario is motivated by the failings he’s seen in long-term care – where his mother developed pneumonia three times before she died in hospital.

PS: Everything that could have been done in the community to keep her in health and a better quality of life, was not done. And the lesson I learned from that is that long-term care for me is necessary but insufficient.

DC: Following the Michigan example, Sharman’s brought the P.A.C.E. program north to downtown Burlington. At this senior’s apartment building they plan to have some health services to reduce visits to hospitals.

PS: Eighty percent of patient load is driven by people over the age of 80. So, if we can take steps to keep people healthier and their quality of life better for longer, we reduce the capacity required in the health care system.

DC: Sandra Short [SS] is one of the first 40 participants. Attracted to her apartment because of this [view of Lake Ontario].

SS: The view is beautiful of the water. I love the water, so that was the big draw.

DC: She takes part in workshops, in classes all right here.

SS: I love the fitness part of it too. It’s good for me, you know. It’s healthy, and it passes the time, you know — and because of the COVID-19.

DC: As P.A.C.E. expands, even more conveniences come when this first-floor renovations is done.

SS: The Community Room is going to be all renovated. It will be beautiful when it’s done. They’re going to have a doctor’s office in here, part time. So that’ll be great. If you want to go and have your blood pressure checked, or something like that. So, I look forward to that being very convenient.

DC: And Paul Sharman has big dreams beyond a single building, because he sees Canada’s aging population.

PS: Well because I’m going to be 80. I see what happened with my mother. And I know there are so many people who are worrying about their parents barely coping. People say, “Okay, we need 30,000 more long-term care beds,” and I’m saying, “No. We need a hundred or two hundred thousand P.A.C.E. capacity.”

DC: He’s convinced this is the model to expand. Support seniors to stay out of care facilities and stay here, in their own homes.

David Common, CBC News, Toronto.

ENDS AT 29:51

**********

FAIR USE NOTICE – For details click here

NOTE: Any ads appearing on Citizen Action Monitor are put here without my knowledge, approval, or endorsement, and I receive no payment for them.

%d bloggers like this: