Citizen Action Monitor

Can Jamie Metzl’s OneShared.World create a political force to influence government decision making?

One immediate challenge facing this new movement is to collectively figure out how to build the world we want.

No 2619 Posted by fw, May 8, 2020 —

Jamie Metzl

“The way we protect ourselves is by protecting all humans, and up to now the voice of our collective humanity just hasn’t been at the table. We have our countries, they come and negotiate with each other and our government representatives are doing what we ask them to do, which is represent the national interests, but nobody’s looking out for our collective interests. And that’s what we’re trying to do – to create [OneShared.World] a social movement and a political force doing just that. …But the problem is we have a world essentially controlled by states. The International organizations are created, funded, and largely controlled by states, and that’s the issue. We don’t have the WHO that we need. My guess is that you ask everybody at the WHO, do they have the tools they need to do their job, they would say ‘No’. …. There’s an old world that’s in many ways collapsing, and the struggle is on to define the terms of this next world. And everybody is organizing. And certainly the forces of nationalism are intolerant, are organizing, and we represent the forces of hope, of people coming together around our common humanity.”Jamie Metzl, DW News

Jamie Frederic Metzl is an American technology futurist, geopolitical expert, author, former partner in a global investment company, and a magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Brown University. Jamie Metzl’s website: https://jamiemetzl.com/    OneShared.World website: https://oneshared.world/

Could the coronavirus pandemic have been stopped before it spread around the world? Yes, says Jamie Metzl of the new initiative OneShared.World. Its goal is to encourage world leaders to work together. Metzl tells DW News’ Brent Goff, governments have failed their populations by not cooperating.

Reposted below is my transcript of an 8:49-minute video interview of Jamie Metzl by Brent Goff, of DW News and host of the program, The Day. The transcript includes my subheadings and text highlighting. And at the bottom of the post is a copy of OneShared.World’s Pledge of Interdependence for Individuals.

Notes: 1) Because the video is not on You Tube, it could not be embedded in my repost. Instead, I have provided a hyperlink to the video that will open in a new tab. 2) The video time length of 12:20 is for the full show of “The Day”, but the interview with Metzl ends at 8:49.

To watch the video on Goff’s DW page (without the transcript), click on the following linked title.

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A Better World After Coronavirus, Brent Goff interviews Jamie Metzl, DW News/The Day, May 7, 2020

OneShared.World – a movement that aims to find global solutions to global problems

Brent Goff  (BG) – Well the coronavirus crisis has highlighted just how interdependent the world really is. A new global initiative called OneShared.World is launching today with the goal of creating a movement that aims to find global solutions to global issues. The initiative hopes to influence government leaders to work together. And has drawn up a declaration of interdependence, which you can sign up to online.

Jamie Metzl, driving force dynamo and founder of OneShared.World packs an impressive resume

Thomas Jefferson wrote the U.S. Declaration of Independence. The Thomas Jefferson of the Declaration of Interdependence, you could say, joins me right now. I’m happy to welcome Jamie Metzl. He is the founder of  OneShared.World. Jamie, it’s good to have you on “The Day”. I’ve been reading through your resume here: Council of Foreign Relations, Council of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Senate Adviser of the Department of the State. You’ve served U.S. presidents on issues such as Iraq and Kosovo. International, global, multilateral. And that also describes OneShared.World, doesn’t it?

Jamie Metzl (JM) – It really does. And I’ve also worked for the United Nations. Right now I’m an expert adviser on human genome editing to the World Health Organization. But even if I was the greatest nationalist in the world, even if I thought that everyone should just look out for themselves, the way that we all need to do it is by recognizing how interdependent we are, and that we cannot survive if we don’t look out for each other. If this virus is teaching us anything, it’s been “Walls don’t work.”

The aim of OneShared.World is to create a social movement and political force to protect our collective interests

The way we protect ourselves is by protecting all humans, and up to now the voice of our collective humanity just hasn’t been at the table. We have our countries, they come and negotiate with each other and our government representatives are doing what we ask them to do, which is represent the national interests, but nobody’s looking out for our collective interests. And that’s what we’re trying to do – to create a social movement and a political force doing just that.

BG – Is OneShared.World an idea that arose because governments have failed – maybe not failed their voters – but maybe failed humanity?

Governments failed us by not being sufficiently well organized to solve the major challenges we face

JM – Absolutely. Our governments have failed us. That’s what this pandemic is. It was totally preventable. It was preventable had China or the United States or others had done a better job up front. That would have prevented it. If we collectively had created a World Health Organization that had the resources and the mandate to do the job we all need it to do, that could have prevented this crisis. This is an entirely avoidable crisis. And the core issue isn’t just the coronavirus, or deadly pathogen, it’s that we aren’t organized to solve any of the major existential, shared challenges we face. And until we do that, we’re just going to keep jumping out of the frying pan and into the fire. And that’s what this movement is about.

BG – You say we’re not organized to deal with these global problems, but isn’t that what the United Nations was created to do? Would you say that the U.N. and the World Health Organization, have they failed us as well?

The U.N. and the WHO failed us because governments failed them

JM – They have, but it’s not their fault. I mean, I love the U.N. As I said before, I used to work for the U.N. I do some work now with the WHO. These are incredible organizations, staffed by some amazing people working their hearts out. But the problem is we have a world essentially controlled by states. The International organizations are created, funded, and largely controlled by states, and that’s the issue. We don’t have the WHO that we need. My guess is that you ask everybody at the WHO, do they have the tools they need to do their job, they would say “No”.

A collective voice for all of us could demand that actions be taken to protect us

We’re not giving them those tools. And the reason we’re not is that there isn’t a collective voice of all of us demanding that actions be taken to protect us. And whether that’s having a real way of responding and preventing pathogenic outbreaks, or addressing issues like climate change, ecosystem destruction, mass hunger, which produces refugee flows, weapons of mass destruction – all of those things – then …

We don’t have the great leaders we had during World War 2

I just want to make another point about the creation of these wonderful institutions like the United Nations – in the old days, in 1941, at the heart of the crises, that we faced then, we had great leaders, like FDR, like Winston Churchill, who had a vision for the what the world could be, and how it could be different. And in most parts of the world, we don’t have those leaders now.

OneShared.World is building something new, a collective structure that represents everybody

And so what we need to do is to divide up that job among all of us. And we have these incredible tools. And you called me the Thomas Jefferson of the Declaration of Interdependence in the lead in, but what we have done is we have hundreds of people from 35 countries who have come together to collectively draft this document. And so we really need to come together in a new way. It may seem impossibly crazy, but the whole idea of the modern nation state – that’s not that old – it’s 1648, Treaty of Westphalia. And then 1945, the end of the Second World War, the beginning of all of these really wonderful international organizations, including the UN and the EU and other things that over the years were created. And now 2020, in many ways, it’s the end of the post-war period. And we’re going to build something new. And the question is  — “What will be the foundations of that new thing?” And we are fighting to make sure that the new structure represents everybody.

BG —  Jamie, I like what you’re saying, but, at least for the time being, we’re stuck with the nation state. And that means leaders such as Donald Trump have a lot of power and a lot of authority. Under President Trump , you know as well as I do, that the U.S. has retreated from its role as the global leader in many areas. Now that could change if a new president is elected in November. What do you do, however, if Trump is re-elected?

OneShared.World is out to “encourage, augment, inspire governments,” not to abolish them

JM – First let me say, I don’t think that we should aspire to a world with no nation states. There’s a lot of things that countries and national governments actually do very well. In no way are we trying to abolish them. But we are wanting to encourage them, to augment them, to inspire them to do the jobs that we need them to do. And one of the reasons why people around the world pay such close attention to American politics is that what happens here really matters for other countries.

One immediate challenge facing this movement is to collectively figure out how to build the world we want

In Germany, Germany is what it is because America won the war. And America played the leading role in helping Germany reconstitute itself into the incredible democracy that it is today. But America, unfortunately, in this regard, lost its way. And so there are many of us here in the United States who are saying that we need to do things differently here. But we, the humans of planet Earth, we need to come together to say collectively “What do we stand for?” and “How do we build the world that we want?” And that’s what our movement is really all about.

BG – Jamie, we’ve got about 45 seconds before we run out of time. I just want ask you – You know that President Trump and Steve Bannon, his former adviser, they represent the thinking that the nation state is the highest good, if you will, when we’re talking about this organization. If he is re-elected, isn’t that going to be a national endorsement of that thinking? What are you going to do then with your idea if you have a re-elected Trump?

The forces of people coming together is in a struggle with the forces of intolerance to define the terms of the next world

JM – So, it’s exactly right. This is a year – I hate to bring in so many historical analogies, but I know how well educated your viewers are – this is a year like 1918 [end of World War One]. There’s new technology. There’s an old world that’s in many ways collapsing, and the struggle is on to define the terms of this next world. And everybody is organizing. And certainly the forces of nationalism are intolerant, are organizing, and we represent the forces of hope, of people coming together around our common humanity.

BG – Jamie, we appreciate you taking the time to talk with us tonight. And we look forward to talking with you again. Jamie Metzl with OneShared.World.

End 8:49

OneShared.World’s Pledge of Interdependence for Individuals

I pledge to:

  1. Support the establishment of a predictive, preventive, and responsive infrastructure to protect us from shared existential threats;
  2. Work to ensure the most disempowered among us may enjoy the same essential liberties as the prominent and powerful, that our human commonality is celebrated within the context of our essential diversity, and that our equally worthy lives may be lived in dignity;
  3. Advocate directly and through the communities, organizations, entities, and nation/s of which I may be part to safeguard our common humanity and shared home;
  4. Promote a safe and sustainable global environment for all the species and ecosystems on our planet;
  5. Guarantee the health, safety, and well-being of all children and all people and to ensure that they have equitable education, health care, and security;
  6. Support and share artistic expression in all its forms to help engender connection, respect, meaning, and communication across cultures;
  7. Uphold and promote human fellowship through mutual consideration, respect, empathy, and kindness; and
  8. Act to the best of my abilities in pursuit of these principles.

With intense hope for a better, brighter future for all, we invite you to pledge your commitment to these principles and join our global movement.

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