Citizen Action Monitor

TPP is slated to become the most harmful trade agreement ever for access to medicines, says MSF president

MSF urges Canada and other TPP negotiating countries to reject this trade treaty

No 1545 Posted by fw, December 18, 2015

“MSF expresses its dismay that TPP countries have agreed to United States government and multinational drug company demands that will raise the price of medicines for millions by unnecessarily extending monopolies and further delaying price-lowering generic competition. The big losers in the TPP are patients and treatment providers in developing countries…. the TPP will still go down in history as the worst trade agreement for access to medicines in developing countries, which will be forced to change their laws to incorporate abusive intellectual property protections for pharmaceutical companies.”Doctors Without Borders / Médecins Sans Frontières

In the short video below, MSF Canada’s president Dr. Heather Culbert warns the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal risks putting essential medicines out of reach for millions of people. Tell International Trade Minister Freeland not ratify any trade agreement that will permit this horrendous unethical, immoral money grab by big pharma. Send your comments to the Government at any time via email to TPP-PTP.consultations@international.gc.ca.

In addition, Sign the MSF TPP petition now, and help keep medicines affordable

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An urgent appeal to Canadians about the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement and its impact on access to medicines by Doctors Without Borders / Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Canada, July 14, 2015

Canada: Time is running out for access to essential medicines. Sign our TPP petition! 

Have you heard of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement? As it stands today, the TPP is slated to become the most harmful trade agreement ever for access to medicines.

The TPP could impose new rules that will extend monopoly protections for pharmaceutical companies, keeping prices sky-high for longer and blocking less expensive generic drugs that are vital to global health from entering the market.

As a medical humanitarian organization working in nearly 70 countries, MSF is concerned about the impact the deal will have on public health in developing countries where the organization works, and beyond. MSF urges the U.S. government to withdraw — and other TPP negotiating countries such as Canada to reject — rules that threaten to dismantle internationally-agreed public health safeguards and restrict access to medicines in developing countries.

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‘The negative impact on public health will be enormous:’ Statement by MSF on the conclusion of Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations in Atlanta by Judit Rius Sanjuan, MSF US, October 05, 2015

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) released the following statement today on the news that an agreement on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) — an international trade deal with severe implications for access to affordable medicines — has been reached by negotiators from 12 Pacific Rim countries, including Canada, in Atlanta. The statement has been issued by Judit Rius Sanjuan, US Manager and Legal Policy Adviser for the MSF Access Campaign:

“MSF expresses its dismay that TPP countries have agreed to United States government and multinational drug company demands that will raise the price of medicines for millions by unnecessarily extending monopolies and further delaying price-lowering generic competition. The big losers in the TPP are patients and treatment providers in developing countries. Although the text has improved over the initial demands, the TPP will still go down in history as the worst trade agreement for access to medicines in developing countries, which will be forced to change their laws to incorporate abusive intellectual property protections for pharmaceutical companies.

For example, the additional monopoly protection provided for biologic drugs will be a new regime for all TPP developing countries. These countries will pay a heavy price in the decades to come that will be measured in the impact it has on patients.  As the trade agreement now goes back to the national level for countries’ final approval, we urge all governments to carefully consider before they sign on the dotted line whether this is the direction they want to take on access to affordable medicines and the promotion of biomedical innovation. The negative impact of the TPP on public health will be enormous, be felt for years to come and it will not be limited to the current 12 TPP countries, as it is a dangerous blueprint for future agreements.”

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