Citizen Action Monitor

Canada ranks 7th, US 16th on the 2014 Social Progress Index

But neither ranks in Top Ten on SPI’s 2 key dimensions — Basic Human Needs and Foundations of Wellbeing

No 1030 Posted by fw, April 10, 2014

Economic growth (GDP) only tells part of the story of a country’s wellbeing.

Numerous studies have found a high correlation between economic growth and a wide variety of social indicators, yet there is growing awareness that economic measures alone do not fully capture social progress. The Social Progress Index (SPI) was designed to provide a valid and reliable measure of social progress.

Social Progress Index 2014 Report by Michael E. Porter, Social Progress Imperative, April 2, 2014

Everybody wants to know the score. So, after a short video introduction, let’s go right to the scoreboard. After the scores, more about the purpose of the report and the mission of the US Organization that prepares it.

First a Video – Explaining the Purpose & Results of the Social Progress Index 2014 (4:33 minutes)

SPI 2014 Report – Top 20 Countries (See page 15 for ranking of all 132 countries included in the report)

RANK SCORE COUNTRY GDP PER CAPITA
1 88.24 New Zealand 25,857
2 88.19 Switzerland 39,293
3 88.07 Iceland 33,880
4 87.37 Netherlands 36,438
5 87.12 Norway 47,547
6 87.08 Sweden 34,945
7 86.95 Canada 35,936
8 86.91 Finland 31,610
9 86.55 Denmark 32,363
10 86.10 Australia 35,669
11 85.11 Austria 36,200
12 84.61 Germany 34,819
13 84.56 United Kingdom 32,671
14 84.21 Japan 31,425
15 84.05 Ireland 36,723
16 82.77 United States 45,336
17 82.63 Belgium 32,639
18 81.65 Slovenia 24,483
19 81.28 Estonia 18,927
20 81.11 France 29,819

Scoreboard for 2 of SPI’s 3 Key Dimensions

The SPI is a measure of social progress, which is defined as —

the capacity of a society to meet the basic human needs of its citizens, establish the building blocks that allow citizens and communities to enhance and sustain the quality of their lives, and create the conditions for all individuals to reach their full potential.

From this definition we derive the three dimensions of the Social Progress Index Framework: Basic Human Needs, Foundations of Wellbeing, and Opportunity. Each of these dimensions is disaggregated into its components (there are four components for each dimension). Each component is based on between three and six indicators.

For additional information about each country in the following two ranked lists, click on the linked country name

Top Ten Countries in Basic Human Needs on the Social Progress Index 2014

1Denmark Overall Social Progress Index rank 9th

2- Switzerland – Overall Social Progress Index Rank 2nd

3- Japan – Overall Social Progress Index rank 14th

4- Finland – Overall Social Progress Index rank 8th

5- Sweden – Overall Social Progress Index rank 6th

6- Austria – Overall Social Progress Index rank 11th

7- Iceland – Overall Social Progress Index rank 12th

8- Netherlands – Overall Social Progress Index rank 4th

9- Ireland – Overall Social Progress Index rank 15th

10- Norway – Overall Social Progress Index rank 5th

*****

Top Ten Countries in Foundations of Wellbeing on Social Progress Index 2014

1- Switzerland – Overall Social Progress Index rank-1st

2- Iceland – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 2nd

3- Netherlands – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 3rd

4- Norway – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 4th

5- Austria – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 11th

6- New Zealand – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 1st

7- Germany – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 12th

8- Denmark – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 9th

9- Sweden – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 6th

10- Estonia – Overall Social Progress Index rank- 19th

*****

United States Scorecard by Dimension, Component and Indicators (From page 63 of the Report)

BASIC HUMAN NEEDS — Rank 23 (Dimension)

Nutrition and Basic Medical Care — Rank 24 (Component)

Undernourishment, Depth of food deficit, Maternal mortality rate, Stillbirth rate, Child mortality rate, Deaths from infectious diseases (Indicators)

Water and Sanitation — Rank 34

Access to piped water, Rural vs. urban access to improved water source, Access to improved sanitation facilities

Shelter — Rank 9

Availability of affordable housing, Access to electricity, Quality of electricity supply, Indoor air pollution attributable deaths

Personal Safety – Rank 31

Homicide rate, Level of violent crime, Perceived criminality, Political terror, Traffic deaths

 FOUNDATIONS OF WELLBEING — Rank 36

Access to Basic Knowledge — Rank 39

Adult literacy rate, Primary school enrollment, Lower secondary school enrollment, Upper secondary school enrollment, Gender parity in secondary enrollment

Access to Information and Communications – Rank 23

Mobile telephone subscriptions, Internet users, press freedom index

Health and Wellness – Rank 70

Life expectancy, Non-communicable disease deaths between 30 and 70, Obesity rate, Outdoor air pollution attributable deaths, Suicide rate

Ecosystem Sustainability – Rank 69

Greenhouse gas emissions, Water withdrawals as a percent of resources, Biodiversity and habitat

 OPPORTUNITY – Rank 5

Personal Rights – Rank 22

Political rights, Freedom of speech, Freedom of assembly/association, Freedom of movement, Private property rights

Personal Freedom and Choice — Rank 15

Freedom over life choices, Freedom of religion, Modern slavery, human trafficking, child marriage, Satisfied demand for contraception, Corruption

Tolerance and Inclusion — Rank 13

Women treated with respect, Tolerance for immigrants, Tolerance for homosexuals, Discrimination and violence against minorities, Religious tolerance, Community safety net

Access to Advanced Education – Rank 1

Years of tertiary schooling,Women’s average years in school,Inequality in the attainment of education,Number of globally ranked universities

~ END OF SCOREBOARD ~

About the Social Progress Index and its founding organization, The Social Progress Imperative

Numerous studies have found a high correlation between economic growth and a wide variety of social indicators, yet there is growing awareness that economic measures alone do not fully capture social progress.

The Social Progress Imperative’s mission is to improve the quality of lives of people around the world, particularly the least well off, by advancing global social progress. The Social Progress Index provides a robust, holistic and innovative measurement tool to guide countries’ choices to enable greater social progress and foster research and knowledge-sharing on the policies and investments that will best achieve that goal. Social progress is defined as the capacity of a society to meet the basic human needs of its citizens, establish the building blocks that allow citizens and communities to enhance and sustain the quality of their lives, and create the conditions for all individuals to reach their full potential.

The Social Progress Index is a tool that we hope will be widely used to inform and influence policies and institutions around the world. The Index is founded on the principle that what we measure guides the choices we make. By measuring the things that really matter to people — their basic needs, their food, shelter and security; their access to healthcare, education, and a healthy environment; their opportunity to improve their lives — the Social Progress Index is an attempt to reshape the debate about development.

Another Video — What Does a Successful Country Look Like (2:44 minutes)

SEE ALSO

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This entry was posted on April 10, 2014 by in evidence based counterpower, NGO counterpower, social action and tagged , .
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