Citizen Action Monitor

People’s movements extend democracy, not military force, says decorated war veteran

Decorated veteran Aaron Hughes will return war medals at anti-NATO protest

No 481 Posted by fw, May 19, 2012

“Every day in this country 18 veterans are committing suicide. Seventeen percent of the individuals that are in combat in Afghanistan, my brothers and sisters, are on psychotropic medication. Twenty to 50 percent of the individuals that are getting deployed to Afghanistan are already diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, military sexual trauma or a traumatic brain injury. Currently one-third of the women in the military are sexually assaulted. It’s clear that these policies of the global war on terror has had a profound effect on the military, my brothers and sisters, while simultaneously perpetuating a failed policy. And unfortunately, we have to live with that failed policy on a daily basis, and we don’t want to be a part of that failed policy anymore.”Aaron Hughes

A hero’s salute for Aaron Hughes and his fellow war vets for their plan to return their war medals at an anti-NATO protest in Chicago this Sunday. Watch a 10:26-minute video of Democracy Now’s interview with Aaron followed by my abridged transcript with added subheadings. To access the complete transcript and video, click on the following linked title.

“What Have We Been Doing?”: Decorated Veteran Aaron Hughes to Return War Medals at Anti-NATO Protest,  Democracy Now, May 16 2012

ABRIDGED TRANSCRIPT

Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman introduces Aaron: “Joining us now in Chicago is Iraq Veterans Against War field organizer Aaron Hughes, who has been helping plan the anti-NATO protest. In 2003, he left the University of Illinois when called to active duty, and was deployed to Kuwait and Iraq. This Sunday, he plans to return his two war medals: his ‘Global War on Terror’ medal and his ‘Army Accommodation’ medal. Aaron Hughes, welcome to Democracy Now!”

Why do this? Why are you returning your medals?

Because every day in this country 18 veterans are committing suicide. Seventeen percent of the individuals that are in combat in Afghanistan, my brothers and sisters, are on psychotropic medication. Twenty to 50 percent of the individuals that are getting deployed to Afghanistan are already diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, military sexual trauma or a traumatic brain injury. Currently one-third of the women in the military are sexually assaulted.

It’s clear that these policies of the global war on terror have had a profound effect on the military, my brothers and sisters, while simultaneously perpetuating a failed policy. And unfortunately, we have to live with that failed policy on a daily basis, and we don’t want to be a part of that failed policy anymore. And we’d like these NATO generals that we served under to acknowledge us, to acknowledge the wrongs that have occurred, to acknowledge our human rights, our right to healthcare, and the rights of the Afghan people and the rights of all these communities, including the communities back at home that are affected by these wars.

“We carry the war burden by ourselves and return home to poor and failing services”

The reality is, there’s a massive disconnect that many service members return to, because our culture and our society is not at war. Less than 1 percent of our country is at war. And unfortunately, we’ve been carrying the burden of that war by ourselves. And we come home to poor and failing resources. Unfortunately, when service members are asking for care, they’re not able to receive that care while they’re in the military. And the VA is highly underfunded, overall.

Traumatized troops are being redeployed while still on paralyzing medications

We currently have been working on a campaign called Operation Recovery, a campaign fighting for service members’ and veterans’ right to heal and a campaign to stop the appointment of traumatized troops. And it’s really appalling that when these brothers and sisters get home and they’re asking for help, that the only type of help that they can get is some type of medication like trazodone, Seroquel, Klonopin, medication that’s practically paralyzing, medication that doesn’t allow them to conduct themselves in any type of regular way. And that’s the standard operating procedures. And yet, those are the same medications that service members are getting redeployed with and redeployed on and conducting military operations on. And this is the same medications that, you know, we are trying to reintegrate into the world with. And it’s—the disconnect between what’s happening in Afghanistan and what’s happened in Iraq with the daily lives of everyone here in the United States is just too vast to overcome.

“On my last convoy out of Iraq, I watched my squad leader cry… What have we been doing?”

I changed my mind [about Iraq] in the midst of what I had seen throughout my deployment. I was deployed for 15 months, and I hauled supplies from the border of Kuwait into Iraq. And when you cross—at the time, when you cross the border into Iraq, there’s a concrete barrier there. And on that concrete barrier, it said, “Beware of children in roadway,” because as soon as you cross the border into Iraq, there would be kids, you know, no less than two-, three-feet tall, willing to jump on a semi truck to get food or water. And when I first crossed that border, I was like, “Hooah. These are the kids I’m going to help. These are the kids I’m here to help build a democracy for. These are the kids I’m here to help provide humanitarian relief for.” And those kids were still on the side of the road six months later, and they were still on the side of the road 12 months later, and they were still on the side of the road 13 months and 14 months and 15 months later.

And on my last convoy out of Iraq, I watched my squad leader, Sergeant Holland, cry. He kept saying, “What have we been doing?” That’s something that haunts me every day. What have we been doing? I ask that to everyone, seriously. What have we been doing? A decade-long war, what have we been doing? And the individuals that have to carry those mistakes on a daily basis are the communities in Afghanistan and the service members, that then return to a society with no—with high unemployment and very little care for them when they return.

Military troops are trained how to kill, not how to win hearts and minds

You know, I can’t really say what will happen when NATO forces withdraw. But what I can say is what’s happening on a daily basis, is we have traumatized troops there conducting military operations, resulting in a failure. We’re talking about trying to conduct a COIN, counterinsurgency doctrine, and we’re trying to win the hearts and minds, when that’s something that the military has never been trained to do. When I went through basic training, I never once learned about democracy. You know, when I went to—when I got deployed to Iraq, we got about a 24-hour briefing on the culture of Iraq. You know, people spend years studying democracy, studying political science, studying different cultures, in order to have a better understanding. We spend nine weeks learning how to kill people. And that’s the reality. That’s what you’re asked and that’s what you’re trained to do. And there’s a moral disconnect—there’s a real moral disconnect between the idea that our military can build a democracy and the idea that our military is trained and designed to control, dominate and kill people.

“People’s movements extend democracy, not military force”

And yet, we continue to ask it to do the same—to build democracy, as if we’ve never read history, as if we’ve never looked at any other occupation throughout history, and that occupations don’t build democracies, don’t extend individuals’ freedoms. You know, the movements—the Arab uprising, the Arab Spring—that was building democracy. The movements of Gandhi, the movements of the civil rights movements here in the United States, people’s movements, that extends democracy, not military force.

At Sunday’s anti-NATO protest, every vet will have an opportunity explain why they are returning their medals

You know, I can’t say exactly how many service members and veterans will be participating, but what I can say is that each of these individuals’ voice is extremely important to hear. And we’re collaborating with Afghans for Peace, and they’re—we’re going to be marching directly with them in the very front of the contingent in military formation. And when we get to the concluding site of the march, there will be a stage. And at the top of that stage, we’ll be lowering an American flag as we play “Taps” and reading off the countries that that flag has flown over during the global war on terror, over the last decade of war. And then each service member will be invited to come up and speak their piece about why they’re returning their service members—their service medals. No one will be speaking for anyone else. We’re inviting each service member and veteran to speak for themselves.

We’ll ask the security force in Chicago to stand with us and not the NATO generals

And then there will be—we’ll be conducting a form of reconciliation and performance of some sorts with the Afghans for Peace, just to highlight the fact that we can see past the socially and politically and—walls that have been promoted, similar how the walls have been written here in Chicago. You know, it’s the demonstrators versus the security. In reality, I’ve been security force. I know what it’s like to stand on those lines. And we’re asking all these individuals that are participating in the security, the Illinois Army National Guard, other individuals that are in the services, stand with their brothers and sisters, stand on this side. Don’t stand with the global 1 percent. Don’t stand with these generals that continuously abuse their own service members and then talk about building democracy and promoting freedom. If they can’t live up to their standards of their own service members, standards and—that they’ve written, then how are they ever going to be able to accomplish any other mission that they’ve talked about?

RELATED VIDEO LINK

Fair Use Notice: This blog, Citizen Action Monitor, may contain copyrighted material that may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material, published without profit, is made available for educational purposes, to advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues. It is published in accordance with the provisions of the 2004 Supreme Court of Canada ruling and its six principle criteria for evaluating fair dealing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Information

This entry was posted on May 19, 2012 by in anti-war action, demonstration counterpower, moral & ethical counterpower, political action and tagged .
%d bloggers like this: