Citizen Action Monitor

Climate Action Network: “It’s time to stand up for clean energy in Ontario”

No 275 Posted by fw, September 14, 2011

Under the banner Clean Energy Ontario, Climate Action Network (CAN) has released a challenge and accompanying grassroots toolkit for Ontarians.

But first —

About Climate Action Network (CAN) — CAN is composed of 83 member organizations(as of September 15, 2011) committed to preventing dangerous levels of human interference with the global climate system, protecting environmental sustainability and public health, while upholding principles of just transition, equity and social justice. CAN Canada believes that to effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions, Canada must make the transition to an economy primarily focused on the efficient use of renewable energy. Actions that Canada takes to meet our Kyoto Protocol obligations must lay the foundation for such a transition.

THE CHALLENGE

We are on the brink of a huge breakthrough in clean energy, clean air, green jobs and fighting climate change in Ontario, but we are also at risk of losing the momentum and getting cut off at the knees just when we are getting started.

On the hopeful side of things, clean energy is finally taking off in Ontario. We are creating thousands of new clean energy jobs and we’ve successfully reduced our use of coal by 90 per cent in less than a decade. On the other hand, there are now politicians who are threatening to kill the momentum that we’ve created just as clean energy is beginning to take off. In many ways, there has never been a more important time for people who care about clean air, clean energy and fighting climate change in Ontario to stand up and speak out. This isn’t about promoting one party over another, it is about sending a clear signal to politicians from all parties that we support clean energy, we want action, and we don’t want to see the progress that we’ve made stripped away from us. Use this toolkit to get informed, and to help you stand up and speak out!

GRASSROOTS TOOLKIT

1. 10 Things You Can Do (see below)

2. Tips on contacting politicians and the media, from Citizens Climate Lobby

3. Campaigns You Can Get Involved In

4. Open letter to political leaders from businesses, from Citizens Climate Lobby

5. Q & A on clean energy in Ontario

6. Pembina Institute’s Wind Fact Sheet

7. FIT Fact Sheet

8. Introduction to the Green Energy Act

9. Resources for Further Reading

10. Relevant Media Articles

10 THINGS YOU CAN DO – This is a teaser of what’s in the Grassroots Toolkit

We are on the brink of a huge breakthrough in clean energy, clean air, green jobs and fighting climate change in Ontario, but we are also at risk of losing the momentum and getting stopped in our tracks just as we are getting started. There has never been a more important time for people who care about clean air, clean energy and fighting climate change in Ontario to stand up and speak out. Different groups can bring different tactics to bear, and we have laid out a menu of options that partners can pursue. This is not exhaustive –we welcome new ideas!

For more info contact Hannah McKinnon: hmckinnon@climateactionnetwork.ca

Community Outreach: We can provide tailored handout materials, and speaking notes if needed, for local volunteers or staff to conduct community outreach at places or events where citizens congregate (including talks, etc).

Local Media Hooks: What are local events or opportunities to get media coverage on where elected officials stand on our issues? Are there events where MPPs will be in attendance and can be asked questions? Are there events we can create to draw in media?

Online Voices: There needs to be many more progressive voices participating actively and consistently in online social media –even for a few minutes each day. We can provide any volunteers willing to do this with guidance and materials to draw from, if you are interested please contact us.

Elected Official Outreach: Have members take it on themselves to track an individual MPP. Set up meetings with elected officials of all political stripes, using local members and supporters to relate directly to their MPPs. Use the ‘Comeclean.ca’ messaging and ask directly for answers on the record (audio/video) to our questions.

Newsletters and Blogs: Content is available for either online or offline newsletters that partner groups circulate to their members or supporters, as well as for partner group blogs.

Video Materials: There is a function on the Come Clean site where ordinary citizens can put their questions to the parties in a non-partisan manner in webcam-style format. Would you or one of your supporters make one?

Essential background pages:You can create and host a web-based factsheet on a key issue. For example, point-form facts, stats, or anecdotes about the benefits of renewable energy. Or facts about health and coal pollution. These will provide something to continuously link to in online social media work, in outreach to press, and on the site itself. Several of these are included in this toolkit.

Email blast asking members to participate: Include a specific task to write a letter to their individual MPP and party leader about where they stand on a specific issues. Provide a few key points to include in the letter.

Sponsor Ads: There are radio, print, and online ads ready to go, some of which can be modified for specific applications. We would welcome partners sponsoring ad placements.

Creative actions: Stage or facilitate a local action to gain attention for clean energy. For example –a flashmob event where people ask if their clean energy jobs will be taken away.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This blog, Citizen Action Monitor, may contain copyrighted material that may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material, published without profit, is made available for educational purposes, to advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues. It is published in accordance with the provisions of the 2004 Supreme Court of Canada ruling and its six principle criteria for evaluating fair dealing.

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