Citizen Action Monitor

Leadnow.ca releases budget priorities from 75 conversations with Canadians

No 137 Posted by fw, March 22, 2011

Following up on a March 5, 2011 post in this blog — Youth-driven organization aims to change the face of federal politics in Canada — Leadnow.ca has released it first report on the feedback received from Canadians who participated in the cross-country conversations. Here is a copy of the press release with some minor editorial changes to separate and highlight the major suggestions submitted by participants:

Leadnow.ca releases budget priorities from 75 coast to coast conversations with Canadians

For immediate release – Monday March 21st, 2011

(Ottawa) As Parliament heads into budget lockdown tomorrow, and with a probable election on the horizon, Leadnow.ca has some helpful hints about what Canadians are looking for in a budget released during hard times and global turmoil.

“Over the last three weeks, Leadnow.ca hosted over 75 face-to-face conversations with Canadians from coast to coast and asked them about their priorities for our government,“ said Jamie Biggar, Executive Director of Leadnow.ca. “When it comes to the budget, here’s what we heard: we need to make smart investments for our future while we protect our people today.”

“The participants want to see money put into developing a clean economy through new energy sources and rail infrastructure.”

“They want money invested in protecting our environment.”

“They want our social safety network strengthened to help the vulnerable, and they are firm about the importance of spending on health and education,” said Biggar.

The conversations were part of an event called (Re)Generation: Voices for Canada that focused on bringing generations of Canadians together to talk about what they want for Canada’s future. The participants ranged in age from their teens to their eighties. The inter-generational setting encouraged a focus on the long-term.

“People understand that we are in a time of real fiscal challenges, and they want to see a smart use of our money. For example, they suggested that money be spent on preventing crime and helping people with mental illness, instead of spending more money holding people in prisons,” said Biggar.

“And, they want to see money shifted away from military spending, and towards maintaining our health and education systems.”

The events were part of a larger process to engage Canadians in creating a Declaration for Change that will call on politicians to work together on major issues facing the country, and back their call with a commitment to vote in the next election. Leadnow.ca is using an online values survey to complement the face-to-face conversations. Thus far, the results of the online values survey echo the results from the local events.

Biggar said that “as we head into what may be a spring election, I hope all of the political parties are hearing from the growing number of Canadians who don’t feel like their priorities are being reflected by government.”

Jamie Biggar is available for comment on the budget.

For more information, contact: media@leadnow.ca

Jamie Biggar, Co-Founder & Executive Director (jamie@leadnow.ca – 778-847-8205)

Adam Shedletzky, Co-Founder (adam@leadnow.ca – 647-213-6591)

FAIR USE NOTICE: This blog, Citizen Action Monitor, may contain copyrighted material that may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material, published without profit, is made available for educational purposes, to advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues. It is published in accordance with the provisions of the 2004 Supreme Court of Canada ruling and its six principle criteria for evaluating fair dealing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: